How Long Does Suboxone Stay In Your System?


How Long Does Suboxone Stay In Your System?

Understanding Suboxone

Are you asking yourself “how long does suboxone stay in your system?” Read on to learn more about this substance and its timeline.

Suboxone is a medicine that helps with the symptoms of opiate withdrawal, including difficulty sleeping, anxiety, agitation, depression, and cravings. It also treats pain that does not respond to other treatments, such as chronic back pain.

How Does Suboxone Work?

Suboxone is a partial opiate agonist that helps to eliminate cravings and withdrawal symptoms. It also decreases pain by working on specific receptors in the nervous system. The side effect of suboxone is it can make you feel sleepy. The half-life of suboxone is around 24 hours. Read more about the long does of Suboxone. 

Is Suboxone Addictive?

Suboxone is usually not considered addictive. But if you are taking too much suboxone, you could experience withdrawal symptoms or cravings. If you have trouble sleeping, your doctor may suggest a dose reduction.

How Long Does Suboxone Stay in Your System?

Suboxone has a relatively short elimination half-life of around 24 hours. This fact means that it’s rapidly eliminated from your body. If you’re taking suboxone to help with opiate withdrawal symptoms, it should be completely metabolized within 10 to 15 days after you stop taking it.
  • How Long Does Suboxone Stay in Your Saliva? Suboxone stays in your saliva for up to two days after taking it.
  • How Long Does Suboxone Stay in Your Urine? Suboxone stays in your urine for up to two days after taking it.
  • How Long Does Suboxone Stay in Your Blood System? Tests can detect suboxone in your blood for up to two days.
  • How Long Does Suboxone Stay in Your Hair? Suboxone can stay in your hair for up to 90 days after you take it.
Read on to learn more about how suboxone can affect your body and the withdrawal symptoms of this drug.

Factors That Affect How Long Suboxone Stays in Your System

Many factors can affect how long suboxone stays in your system. However, it’s important to remember that many of these factors are only relevant to those taking them for pain management.

Suboxone Withdrawal and Side Effects

After taking suboxone for an extended period, withdrawal symptoms can occur. You should consult your doctor if you experience a number of these effects, or if they’re particularly severe.

How Long Is Suboxone Withdrawal?

Suboxone withdrawal symptoms are relatively short. They can last anywhere between 10 to 15 days. However, it’s not uncommon for withdrawal symptoms to last longer than this.

Suboxone Withdrawal Timeline

The timeline of suboxone withdrawal is as follows:
  • Days 1-2: Withdrawal symptoms are felt. These include nausea, vomiting, sweating, anxiety, and agitation.
  • Days 3-5: Withdrawal symptoms continue. You may experience flu-like symptoms, headaches, pains, and aches.
  • Days 5-10: Some withdrawal symptoms will begin to subside. You may also begin to feel more like yourself.

Suboxone Withdrawal Symptoms

Suboxone withdrawal symptoms include the following:
  • Nausea: These symptoms start to increase over the first few days of stopping suboxone. You may feel nauseous when you wake up in the morning.
  • Vomiting: You may want to vomit after taking long doses of Suboxone. You may even vomit if you’re eating fatty foods.
  • Sweating: Sweating is a common side effect of suboxone withdrawal. It seems to be more prevalent in those who have high blood pressure.

The buprenorphine in Suboxone has an especially long elimination half-life compared to other opioids. Elimination half-life refers to the amount of time it takes for half of a single dose of a drug to leave the body. For buprenorphine, this period lasts for 37 hours, meaning that it can take over 8 days for Suboxone to no longer be detectable in a person’s body.


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